Census releases House apportionment for next decade

Texas will gain two congressional seats, while a number of Northeast and Midwest states will see their delegations shrink slightly, according to the new apportionment figures released Monday by the Census Bureau.

The apportionment numbers, based on the 2020 census, continue a decades-long shift of political power from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt. But California, the nation’s largest state, also saw its population growth slow enough that it lost a House seat for the first time.

Texas, which had 36 congressional seats for the past decade, will elect two additional members of the House in next year’s midterm elections. Other states that will add a single House seat: Colorado, Florida, Montana, North Carolina and Oregon.

Meanwhile, seven states each lost a seat. Other than California, they were all east of the Mississippi River: Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

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Texas will gain two congressional seats, while a number of Northeast and Midwest states will see their delegations shrink slightly, according to the new apportionment figures released Monday by the Census Bureau.

The apportionment numbers, based on the 2020 census, continue a decades-long shift of political power from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt. But California, the nation’s largest state, also saw its population growth slow enough that it lost a House seat for the first time.

Texas, which had 36 congressional seats for the past decade, will elect two additional members of the House in next year’s midterm elections. Other states that will add a single House seat: Colorado, Florida, Montana, North Carolina and Oregon.

Meanwhile, seven states each lost a seat. Other than California, they were all east of the Mississippi River: Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

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